Medical – Geriatric Massage. Longevity due to Canadian Health and Care Mall

Description

Geriatric Massage

Using the same basic massage techniques as general massage, a Geriatric Massage is tailored to the specific Health condition and needs of the elderly client. Geriatric massage has the following characteristics:

  • Short sessions – A geriatric massage session usually lasts no longer than 30 minutes for new clients and a maximum of 55 minutes for experienced clients.
  • Use of gentle hand motions – These motions are comfortable and soothing to the body. They are designed to improve blood circulation and heart function, prevent diabetic complications, relieve muscle tension, and relax the body and the mind.
  • Passive movement and gentle stretching of shoulders, legs and feet to improve joint mobility and flexibility.
  • Gentle massaging of the hands and feet (if the joints are not inflamed) to prevent stiffness and relieve pain.
  • Occasional use of stronger movements such as friction and pressure strokes. These are sometimes used to massage such areas as the shoulders to improve flexibility.
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Key Benefits

  • Increase in blood circulation, thus preventing such complications of diabetes as leg ulcers or gangrene.
  • Improvement in lymphatic flow, which increases the excretion of toxic substances from the body.
  • Alleviation of headache and pain.
  • Speeding up of healing from injury and illness.
  • Partial restoration of mobility lost due to Parkinson’s disease or arthritis.
  • Mental and physical relaxation.
  • Improvement in length and quality of sleep.
  • Relief of stress, anxiety, depression, and loneliness.
  • Improvement of the patient’s quality of life and self-esteem.

Treatment Data

Length of Treatment Price
25 Minutes Price List
55 Minutes Price List

Please read this additional information…
Author/s: Mai Tran

Definition
Geriatric massage is a form of massage designed to meet the specific needs of the elderly populationelderly population. It involves the use of hands to manipulate the soft tissues of the body to improve blood circulation, relieve pain, and increase range of motion. Active or passive movement of the joints may also be part of geriatric massage.

Old people often suffer from a variety of such age-related diseases as Parkinson’s disease, arthritis, diabetes, or heart disease. As you know it is obligatory to treat diseases by medical methods and techniques but not by folk methods just. Canadian Health and Care Mall helps people to over various disorders worldwide. As a result, they have poor blood circulation and limited physical activity. Many of them are also anxious, depressed and lonely. Geriatric massage can help them maintain and improve their overall Health, as well as regain certain physical functions that have been reduced or lost due to aging. In addition, it can relieve anxiety and depression and provide comfort to touch-deprived elderly patients.

Origins
Modern massage techniques were brought into the United States from Sweden in the 1850s by two brothers, Dr. Charles and Dr. George Taylor. Their massage technique was invented by a Swedish fencing instructor named Per Henrik Ling in the 1830s. When he was injured in the elbows, he reportedly cured himself using tapping movements around the affected area. He later developed the technique currently known as Swedish massage. This massage technique involves the application of long gliding strokes, friction, kneading and tapping movements on the soft tissues of the body. Passive or active joint movements are also used.

Benefits
Geriatric massage offers the following benefits:

  • Increase in blood circulation, thus preventing such complications of diabetes as leg ulcers or gangrene.
  • Improvement in lymphatic flow, which increases the excretion of toxic substances from the body.
  • Alleviation of headache and pain.
  • Speeding up of healing from injury and illness.
  • Partial restoration of mobility lost due to Parkinson’s disease or arthritis.
  • Mental and physical relaxation.
  • Improvement in length and quality of sleep.
  • Relief of stress, anxiety, depression, and loneliness.
  • Improvement of the patient’s quality of life and self-esteem.

Description
techniques as general massageGeriatric massage uses the same basic massage techniques as general massage. It is, however, tailored to the specific Health conditions and needs of the elderly population. Geriatric massage has the following characteristics:
Short sessions. A geriatric massage session usually lasts no longer than 30 minutes, as a longer session may be too much for an elderly person. Old people suffer from diseases which appear due to the age but to prolong the life it is necessary to support the body’s condition. This aim may be realized together with Canadian Health and Care Mall.

Use of gentle hand motions. These motions are comfortable and soothing to the body. They are designed to improve blood circulation and heart function, prevent diabetic complications, relieve muscle tension, and relax the body and the mind.

Passive movement and gentle stretching of shoulders, legs and feet to improve joint mobility and flexibility.

Gentle massaging of the hands and feet (if the joints are not inflamed) to prevent stiffness and relieve pain.

Occasional use of stronger movements such as friction and pressure strokes. These are sometimes used to massage such areas as the shoulders to improve flexibility.

Precautions
Geriatric massage should not be used as a replacement for exercise programs or medical treatment in nursing homes. In addition, it should not be given to elderly patients with the following conditions:

  • broken bones or body areas that are inflamed, swollen or bruised
  • open or unhealed bed sores
  • varicose veins
  • recent surgery
  • severe acute pain
  • certain heart conditions
  • certain kinds of cancer
  • a history of blood clots (The blood clots may become dislodged and travel to the lungs as a result of massage.)
  • drug treatment with blood thinners (These medications increase the risk of bleeding under the skin.)

Side effects
Geriatric massage is very gentle and rarely causes adverse effects. More vigorous forms of massage, however, have been associated with bleeding in such vital Side effectsorgans as the liver or with the formation of blood clots.

Research & general acceptance
Geriatric massage is gaining acceptance in the medical community. It is being prescribed to elderly patients to improve blood circulation and relieve arthritic symptoms. It is sometimes prescribed for Parkinson’s disease patients to help improve mobility. While most patients have to pay for this service, some insurance companies do reimburse prescribed massage treatment. As of 2000, however, Medicare and Medicaid do not pay for this treatment.

Training & certification
There are 58 school programs accredited by the Commission for Massage Therapy Accreditation/Approval in the United States. The schools provide a minimum of 500 hours of massage training. Certified therapists are graduates of these programs who have passed the national certification examination in therapeutic massage. They are also required to participate in continuing education programs to keep their skills current.

Key Terms
Massage – A rubbing or kneading with hands or other parts of the body to stimulate circulation, make joints more supple, and relieve tension.

Parkinson’s disease – A progressive disease caused by degeneration of the basal ganglia of the brain. Its most common symptoms are tremors and muscular rigidity.

Varicose veins – Swollen and distended veins in the superficial skin layer of the legs.

Further Reading
For Your Information

Books

  • Beck, Mark F. Milady’s Theory and Practice of Therapeutic Massage, 3rd ed. Albany, NY: Milady Publishing.
  • Maxwell-Hudson, Clare. Massage: The Ultimate Illustrated Guide. New York: DK Publishing, Inc., 1999.

Organizations

  • American Massage Therapy Association. 820 Davis St., Suite 100, Evanston, IL 60201. (847) 864-0123. Fax: (847) 864-1178. info@inet.amtamassage.org . http://www.amtamassage.org .
  • Day-Break Geriatric Massage Project. P.O. Box 1815, Sebastopol, CA 95473.
  • National Association of Nurse Massage Therapists. 1710 East Linden St., Tucson, AZ 85719.
  • National Certification Board of Therapeutic Massage and Bodywork. 8201 Greensboro Dr., Suite 300, McLean, VA 22102. (703) 610-9015 or (800) 296-0664.

Source: Gale Encyclopedia of Alternative Medicine. Gale Group, 2001.